Monthly Archives: September 2016

Student Village
Amsterdam, NL

The area of Sloterdijk, just west of Amsterdam, is presently undergoing a radical transformation. After the financial crisis of 2008, many of the office buildings in Sloterdijk suffered from high rates of vacancy. Because of the lack of housing and other amenities in this relatively mono-functional office area, this lead to a decay of the environment as a whole. The municipality therefore made the decision to formulate a new zoning plan that allowed for 1,500 to 2,000 new dwellings and transformation of office buildings into short-stay apartments, answering to the need to build more housing in Amsterdam.

Wasa Student Village will be realized on a central location close to the Sloterdijk Station. What sets the project apart is its modular construction, based on a prefabricated housing unit for students. The construction method and low cost of construction means that the buildings can be taken apart and recycled after 10 years to make room for permanent housing. Because of the limited size of the apartments, care has been put in the design of the public spaces around the buildings. The height difference between the eastern and western edge of the plot has led to a series of planted irregular terraces that create a semiprivate zone around the buildings. A slight variation is introduced by applying three different motifs of wooden cladding on the blocks, reinforcing the impression of a village.

Student Village
Amsterdam, NL

The area of Sloterdijk, just west of Amsterdam, is presently undergoing a radical transformation. After the financial crisis of 2008, many of the office buildings in Sloterdijk suffered from high rates of vacancy. Because of the lack of housing and other amenities in this relatively mono-functional office area, this lead to a decay of the environment as a whole. The municipality therefore made the decision to formulate a new zoning plan that allowed for 1,500 to 2,000 new dwellings and transformation of office buildings into short-stay apartments, answering to the need to build more housing in Amsterdam.

Wasa Student Village will be realized on a central location close to the Sloterdijk Station. What sets the project apart is its modular construction, based on a prefabricated housing unit for students. The construction method and low cost of construction means that the buildings can be taken apart and recycled after 10 years to make room for permanent housing. Because of the limited size of the apartments, care has been put in the design of the public spaces around the buildings. The height difference between the eastern and western edge of the plot has led to a series of planted irregular terraces that create a semiprivate zone around the buildings. A slight variation is introduced by applying three different motifs of wooden cladding on the blocks, reinforcing the impression of a village.

Student Village
Amsterdam, NL

The area of Sloterdijk, just west of Amsterdam, is presently undergoing a radical transformation. After the financial crisis of 2008, many of the office buildings in Sloterdijk suffered from high rates of vacancy. Because of the lack of housing and other amenities in this relatively mono-functional office area, this lead to a decay of the environment as a whole. The municipality therefore made the decision to formulate a new zoning plan that allowed for 1,500 to 2,000 new dwellings and transformation of office buildings into short-stay apartments, answering to the need to build more housing in Amsterdam.

Wasa Student Village will be realized on a central location close to the Sloterdijk Station. What sets the project apart is its modular construction, based on a prefabricated housing unit for students. The construction method and low cost of construction means that the buildings can be taken apart and recycled after 10 years to make room for permanent housing. Because of the limited size of the apartments, care has been put in the design of the public spaces around the buildings. The height difference between the eastern and western edge of the plot has led to a series of planted irregular terraces that create a semiprivate zone around the buildings. A slight variation is introduced by applying three different motifs of wooden cladding on the blocks, reinforcing the impression of a village.

Student Village
Amsterdam, NL

The area of Sloterdijk, just west of Amsterdam, is presently undergoing a radical transformation. After the financial crisis of 2008, many of the office buildings in Sloterdijk suffered from high rates of vacancy. Because of the lack of housing and other amenities in this relatively mono-functional office area, this lead to a decay of the environment as a whole. The municipality therefore made the decision to formulate a new zoning plan that allowed for 1,500 to 2,000 new dwellings and transformation of office buildings into short-stay apartments, answering to the need to build more housing in Amsterdam.

Wasa Student Village will be realized on a central location close to the Sloterdijk Station. What sets the project apart is its modular construction, based on a prefabricated housing unit for students. The construction method and low cost of construction means that the buildings can be taken apart and recycled after 10 years to make room for permanent housing. Because of the limited size of the apartments, care has been put in the design of the public spaces around the buildings. The height difference between the eastern and western edge of the plot has led to a series of planted irregular terraces that create a semiprivate zone around the buildings. A slight variation is introduced by applying three different motifs of wooden cladding on the blocks, reinforcing the impression of a village.

Student Village
Amsterdam, NL

The area of Sloterdijk, just west of Amsterdam, is presently undergoing a radical transformation. After the financial crisis of 2008, many of the office buildings in Sloterdijk suffered from high rates of vacancy. Because of the lack of housing and other amenities in this relatively mono-functional office area, this lead to a decay of the environment as a whole. The municipality therefore made the decision to formulate a new zoning plan that allowed for 1,500 to 2,000 new dwellings and transformation of office buildings into short-stay apartments, answering to the need to build more housing in Amsterdam.

Wasa Student Village will be realized on a central location close to the Sloterdijk Station. What sets the project apart is its modular construction, based on a prefabricated housing unit for students. The construction method and low cost of construction means that the buildings can be taken apart and recycled after 10 years to make room for permanent housing. Because of the limited size of the apartments, care has been put in the design of the public spaces around the buildings. The height difference between the eastern and western edge of the plot has led to a series of planted irregular terraces that create a semiprivate zone around the buildings. A slight variation is introduced by applying three different motifs of wooden cladding on the blocks, reinforcing the impression of a village.

Casa Tumán
Puertecillo, Chile

Casa Tumán is a private villa in the central coastal region of Chile, designed and built by Amsterdam-based office Studio Selva with mostly locally sourced materials.

The villa is in fact a tailor-made surfer's holiday home, with a layout and materialization vaguely referring to chilean farmhouses. The small floorplan of 50 m² has been laid out in 6 modules: four bedrooms, one bathroom and one kitchen module. Each bedroom has an independent access to a generous roofed terrace, conceived as a shared common space; as a living room with a magnificent view of the sea. The post-and-beam wooden construction with strawbale infill walls and clay-plaster creates an excellent indoor climate in this humid region.

Photos by Nicolas Saieh

 

Casa Tumán
Puertecillo, Chile

Casa Tumán is a private villa in the central coastal region of Chile, designed and built by Amsterdam-based office Studio Selva with mostly locally sourced materials.

The villa is in fact a tailor-made surfer's holiday home, with a layout and materialization vaguely referring to chilean farmhouses. The small floorplan of 50 m² has been laid out in 6 modules: four bedrooms, one bathroom and one kitchen module. Each bedroom has an independent access to a generous roofed terrace, conceived as a shared common space; as a living room with a magnificent view of the sea. The post-and-beam wooden construction with strawbale infill walls and clay-plaster creates an excellent indoor climate in this humid region.

Photos by Nicolas Saieh

 

Casa Tumán
Puertecillo, Chile

Casa Tumán is a private villa in the central coastal region of Chile, designed and built by Amsterdam-based office Studio Selva with mostly locally sourced materials.

The villa is in fact a tailor-made surfer's holiday home, with a layout and materialization vaguely referring to chilean farmhouses. The small floorplan of 50 m² has been laid out in 6 modules: four bedrooms, one bathroom and one kitchen module. Each bedroom has an independent access to a generous roofed terrace, conceived as a shared common space; as a living room with a magnificent view of the sea. The post-and-beam wooden construction with strawbale infill walls and clay-plaster creates an excellent indoor climate in this humid region.

Photos by Nicolas Saieh

 

Casa Tumán
Puertecillo, Chile

Casa Tumán is a private villa in the central coastal region of Chile, designed and built by Amsterdam-based office Studio Selva with mostly locally sourced materials.

The villa is in fact a tailor-made surfer's holiday home, with a layout and materialization vaguely referring to chilean farmhouses. The small floorplan of 50 m² has been laid out in 6 modules: four bedrooms, one bathroom and one kitchen module. Each bedroom has an independent access to a generous roofed terrace, conceived as a shared common space; as a living room with a magnificent view of the sea. The post-and-beam wooden construction with strawbale infill walls and clay-plaster creates an excellent indoor climate in this humid region.

Photos by Nicolas Saieh

 

Casa Tumán
Puertecillo, Chile

Casa Tumán is a private villa in the central coastal region of Chile, designed and built by Amsterdam-based office Studio Selva with mostly locally sourced materials.

The villa is in fact a tailor-made surfer's holiday home, with a layout and materialization vaguely referring to chilean farmhouses. The small floorplan of 50 m² has been laid out in 6 modules: four bedrooms, one bathroom and one kitchen module. Each bedroom has an independent access to a generous roofed terrace, conceived as a shared common space; as a living room with a magnificent view of the sea. The post-and-beam wooden construction with strawbale infill walls and clay-plaster creates an excellent indoor climate in this humid region.

Photos by Nicolas Saieh

 

Casa Tumán
Puertecillo, Chile

Casa Tumán is a private villa in the central coastal region of Chile, designed and built by Amsterdam-based office Studio Selva with mostly locally sourced materials.

The villa is in fact a tailor-made surfer's holiday home, with a layout and materialization vaguely referring to chilean farmhouses. The small floorplan of 50 m² has been laid out in 6 modules: four bedrooms, one bathroom and one kitchen module. Each bedroom has an independent access to a generous roofed terrace, conceived as a shared common space; as a living room with a magnificent view of the sea. The post-and-beam wooden construction with strawbale infill walls and clay-plaster creates an excellent indoor climate in this humid region.

Photos by Nicolas Saieh

 

Casa Tumán
Puertecillo, Chile

Casa Tumán is a private villa in the central coastal region of Chile, designed and built by Amsterdam-based office Studio Selva with mostly locally sourced materials.

The villa is in fact a tailor-made surfer's holiday home, with a layout and materialization vaguely referring to chilean farmhouses. The small floorplan of 50 m² has been laid out in 6 modules: four bedrooms, one bathroom and one kitchen module. Each bedroom has an independent access to a generous roofed terrace, conceived as a shared common space; as a living room with a magnificent view of the sea. The post-and-beam wooden construction with strawbale infill walls and clay-plaster creates an excellent indoor climate in this humid region.

Photos by Nicolas Saieh

 

Casa Tumán
Puertecillo, Chile

Casa Tumán is a private villa in the central coastal region of Chile, designed and built by Amsterdam-based office Studio Selva with mostly locally sourced materials.

The villa is in fact a tailor-made surfer's holiday home, with a layout and materialization vaguely referring to chilean farmhouses. The small floorplan of 50 m² has been laid out in 6 modules: four bedrooms, one bathroom and one kitchen module. Each bedroom has an independent access to a generous roofed terrace, conceived as a shared common space; as a living room with a magnificent view of the sea. The post-and-beam wooden construction with strawbale infill walls and clay-plaster creates an excellent indoor climate in this humid region.

Photos by Nicolas Saieh

 

Casa Tumán
Puertecillo, Chile

Casa Tumán is a private villa in the central coastal region of Chile, designed and built by Amsterdam-based office Studio Selva with mostly locally sourced materials.

The villa is in fact a tailor-made surfer's holiday home, with a layout and materialization vaguely referring to chilean farmhouses. The small floorplan of 50 m² has been laid out in 6 modules: four bedrooms, one bathroom and one kitchen module. Each bedroom has an independent access to a generous roofed terrace, conceived as a shared common space; as a living room with a magnificent view of the sea. The post-and-beam wooden construction with strawbale infill walls and clay-plaster creates an excellent indoor climate in this humid region.

Photos by Nicolas Saieh

 

Casa Tumán
Puertecillo, Chile

Casa Tumán is a private villa in the central coastal region of Chile, designed and built by Amsterdam-based office Studio Selva with mostly locally sourced materials.

The villa is in fact a tailor-made surfer's holiday home, with a layout and materialization vaguely referring to chilean farmhouses. The small floorplan of 50 m² has been laid out in 6 modules: four bedrooms, one bathroom and one kitchen module. Each bedroom has an independent access to a generous roofed terrace, conceived as a shared common space; as a living room with a magnificent view of the sea. The post-and-beam wooden construction with strawbale infill walls and clay-plaster creates an excellent indoor climate in this humid region.

Photos by Nicolas Saieh

 

Casa Tumán
Puertecillo, Chile

Casa Tumán is a private villa in the central coastal region of Chile, designed and built by Amsterdam-based office Studio Selva with mostly locally sourced materials.

The villa is in fact a tailor-made surfer's holiday home, with a layout and materialization vaguely referring to chilean farmhouses. The small floorplan of 50 m² has been laid out in 6 modules: four bedrooms, one bathroom and one kitchen module. Each bedroom has an independent access to a generous roofed terrace, conceived as a shared common space; as a living room with a magnificent view of the sea. The post-and-beam wooden construction with strawbale infill walls and clay-plaster creates an excellent indoor climate in this humid region.

Photos by Nicolas Saieh

 

Westersingel Bridge
Rotterdam, NL

The shape of the new bridge follows the logical movement of the pedestrians that cross from the urban context of Kortenaerstraat over the water, and to the right or left in the informal and green surroundings of the Westersingel. The strict but at the same time organic shape gives the bridge a contemporary and romantic character that fits the atmosphere of the area. Its lightly bent shape lets maintenance boats pass underneath, while emphasizing the effort of crossing the bridge.

The railing consists of brass profiles. This choice of material refers to the bronze public artworks that are lining the Westersingel. The idea is to apply sustainable and honest materials in a contemporary manner, with a refined detailing. In this way the new bridge can be seen as a city ornament, strengthening the monumental heritage status of its surroundings.

Project in collaboration with Anouk Vogel

Photos by Jeroen Musch

Westersingel Bridge
Rotterdam, NL

The shape of the new bridge follows the logical movement of the pedestrians that cross from the urban context of Kortenaerstraat over the water, and to the right or left in the informal and green surroundings of the Westersingel. The strict but at the same time organic shape gives the bridge a contemporary and romantic character that fits the atmosphere of the area. Its lightly bent shape lets maintenance boats pass underneath, while emphasizing the effort of crossing the bridge.

The railing consists of brass profiles. This choice of material refers to the bronze public artworks that are lining the Westersingel. The idea is to apply sustainable and honest materials in a contemporary manner, with a refined detailing. In this way the new bridge can be seen as a city ornament, strengthening the monumental heritage status of its surroundings.

Project in collaboration with Anouk Vogel

Photos by Jeroen Musch

Westersingel Bridge
Rotterdam, NL

The shape of the new bridge follows the logical movement of the pedestrians that cross from the urban context of Kortenaerstraat over the water, and to the right or left in the informal and green surroundings of the Westersingel. The strict but at the same time organic shape gives the bridge a contemporary and romantic character that fits the atmosphere of the area. Its lightly bent shape lets maintenance boats pass underneath, while emphasizing the effort of crossing the bridge.

The railing consists of brass profiles. This choice of material refers to the bronze public artworks that are lining the Westersingel. The idea is to apply sustainable and honest materials in a contemporary manner, with a refined detailing. In this way the new bridge can be seen as a city ornament, strengthening the monumental heritage status of its surroundings.

Project in collaboration with Anouk Vogel

Photos by Jeroen Musch

Westersingel Bridge
Rotterdam, NL

The shape of the new bridge follows the logical movement of the pedestrians that cross from the urban context of Kortenaerstraat over the water, and to the right or left in the informal and green surroundings of the Westersingel. The strict but at the same time organic shape gives the bridge a contemporary and romantic character that fits the atmosphere of the area. Its lightly bent shape lets maintenance boats pass underneath, while emphasizing the effort of crossing the bridge.

The railing consists of brass profiles. This choice of material refers to the bronze public artworks that are lining the Westersingel. The idea is to apply sustainable and honest materials in a contemporary manner, with a refined detailing. In this way the new bridge can be seen as a city ornament, strengthening the monumental heritage status of its surroundings.

Project in collaboration with Anouk Vogel

Photos by Jeroen Musch

Westersingel Bridge
Rotterdam, NL

The shape of the new bridge follows the logical movement of the pedestrians that cross from the urban context of Kortenaerstraat over the water, and to the right or left in the informal and green surroundings of the Westersingel. The strict but at the same time organic shape gives the bridge a contemporary and romantic character that fits the atmosphere of the area. Its lightly bent shape lets maintenance boats pass underneath, while emphasizing the effort of crossing the bridge.

The railing consists of brass profiles. This choice of material refers to the bronze public artworks that are lining the Westersingel. The idea is to apply sustainable and honest materials in a contemporary manner, with a refined detailing. In this way the new bridge can be seen as a city ornament, strengthening the monumental heritage status of its surroundings.

Project in collaboration with Anouk Vogel

Photos by Jeroen Musch