Westersingel Bridge
Rotterdam, NL

The shape of the new bridge follows the logical movement of the pedestrians that cross from the urban context of Kortenaerstraat over the water, and to the right or left in the informal and green surroundings of the Westersingel. The strict but at the same time organic shape gives the bridge a contemporary and romantic character that fits the atmosphere of the area. Its lightly bent shape lets maintenance boats pass underneath, while emphasizing the effort of crossing the bridge.

The railing consists of brass profiles. This choice of material refers to the bronze public artworks that are lining the Westersingel. The idea is to apply sustainable and honest materials in a contemporary manner, with a refined detailing. In this way the new bridge can be seen as a city ornament, strengthening the monumental heritage status of its surroundings.

Westersingel Bridge
Rotterdam, NL

The shape of the new bridge follows the logical movement of the pedestrians that cross from the urban context of Kortenaerstraat over the water, and to the right or left in the informal and green surroundings of the Westersingel. The strict but at the same time organic shape gives the bridge a contemporary and romantic character that fits the atmosphere of the area. Its lightly bent shape lets maintenance boats pass underneath, while emphasizing the effort of crossing the bridge.

The railing consists of brass profiles. This choice of material refers to the bronze public artworks that are lining the Westersingel. The idea is to apply sustainable and honest materials in a contemporary manner, with a refined detailing. In this way the new bridge can be seen as a city ornament, strengthening the monumental heritage status of its surroundings.

Westersingel Bridge
Rotterdam, NL

The shape of the new bridge follows the logical movement of the pedestrians that cross from the urban context of Kortenaerstraat over the water, and to the right or left in the informal and green surroundings of the Westersingel. The strict but at the same time organic shape gives the bridge a contemporary and romantic character that fits the atmosphere of the area. Its lightly bent shape lets maintenance boats pass underneath, while emphasizing the effort of crossing the bridge.

The railing consists of brass profiles. This choice of material refers to the bronze public artworks that are lining the Westersingel. The idea is to apply sustainable and honest materials in a contemporary manner, with a refined detailing. In this way the new bridge can be seen as a city ornament, strengthening the monumental heritage status of its surroundings.

Westersingel Bridge
Rotterdam, NL

The shape of the new bridge follows the logical movement of the pedestrians that cross from the urban context of Kortenaerstraat over the water, and to the right or left in the informal and green surroundings of the Westersingel. The strict but at the same time organic shape gives the bridge a contemporary and romantic character that fits the atmosphere of the area. Its lightly bent shape lets maintenance boats pass underneath, while emphasizing the effort of crossing the bridge.

The railing consists of brass profiles. This choice of material refers to the bronze public artworks that are lining the Westersingel. The idea is to apply sustainable and honest materials in a contemporary manner, with a refined detailing. In this way the new bridge can be seen as a city ornament, strengthening the monumental heritage status of its surroundings.

Westersingel Bridge
Rotterdam, NL

The shape of the new bridge follows the logical movement of the pedestrians that cross from the urban context of Kortenaerstraat over the water, and to the right or left in the informal and green surroundings of the Westersingel. The strict but at the same time organic shape gives the bridge a contemporary and romantic character that fits the atmosphere of the area. Its lightly bent shape lets maintenance boats pass underneath, while emphasizing the effort of crossing the bridge.

The railing consists of brass profiles. This choice of material refers to the bronze public artworks that are lining the Westersingel. The idea is to apply sustainable and honest materials in a contemporary manner, with a refined detailing. In this way the new bridge can be seen as a city ornament, strengthening the monumental heritage status of its surroundings.

Estudio Mauco
Mauco, Chile

We were asked by a sound producer to design a free-standing recording studio near his home, on a large plot of about 3000 m² on the top of a hill part of the central coastal mountains of Chile. The idea was to keep the shape simple and practical, with two separate spaces: one recording room and one control room, in total 60 m².

We arranged the spaces in a rectangular shape with a central pillar (wooden trunk) from where a radial organization of the beams are arranged. To add some extra movement we decided to vary the inclination of each beam. The result is a beautiful irregular roof that covers both the aesthetic aspect and the acoustic quality required for this building. The materialisation was also chosen considering the sound insulation, with a light timber frame structure, in-fill wall of strawbales and clay plaster with an interior white lime render finish.

The project is in execution phase, built by earth experts Vernaculart and is planned to be finalized in November 2016.

Estudio Mauco
Mauco, Chile

We were asked by a sound producer to design a free-standing recording studio near his home, on a large plot of about 3000 m² on the top of a hill part of the central coastal mountains of Chile. The idea was to keep the shape simple and practical, with two separate spaces: one recording room and one control room, in total 60 m².

We arranged the spaces in a rectangular shape with a central pillar (wooden trunk) from where a radial organization of the beams are arranged. To add some extra movement we decided to vary the inclination of each beam. The result is a beautiful irregular roof that covers both the aesthetic aspect and the acoustic quality required for this building. The materialisation was also chosen considering the sound insulation, with a light timber frame structure, in-fill wall of strawbales and clay plaster with an interior white lime render finish.

The project is in execution phase, built by earth experts Vernaculart and is planned to be finalized in November 2016.

Student Village
Amsterdam, NL

The area of Sloterdijk, just west of Amsterdam, is presently undergoing a radical transformation. After the financial crisis of 2008, many of the office buildings in Sloterdijk suffered from high rates of vacancy. Because of the lack of housing and other amenities in this relatively mono-functional office area, this lead to a decay of the environment as a whole. The municipality therefore made the decision to formulate a new zoning plan that allowed for 1,500 to 2,000 new dwellings and transformation of office buildings into short-stay apartments, answering to the need to build more housing in Amsterdam.

The Student Village will be realized on a central location close to the Sloterdijk Station. What sets the project apart is its modular construction, based on a prefabricated housing unit for students. The construction method and low cost of construction means that the buildings can be taken apart and recycled after 10 years to make room for permanent housing. Because of the limited size of the apartments, care has been put in the design of the public spaces around the buildings. The height difference between the eastern and western edge of the area has led to a series of terraces that create a semiprivate zone around the buildings. Underneath the railway bridge north of the area is a protected area for outdoor sport, cinema, events and bicycle parking. On top of the coated steel panels of the units is a “second skin” of translucent screens of different colors. The screens give privacy to the inhabitants while letting light into the apartments, and lends an expression of lightness to the area.

Student Village
Amsterdam, NL

The area of Sloterdijk, just west of Amsterdam, is presently undergoing a radical transformation. After the financial crisis of 2008, many of the office buildings in Sloterdijk suffered from high rates of vacancy. Because of the lack of housing and other amenities in this relatively mono-functional office area, this lead to a decay of the environment as a whole. The municipality therefore made the decision to formulate a new zoning plan that allowed for 1,500 to 2,000 new dwellings and transformation of office buildings into short-stay apartments, answering to the need to build more housing in Amsterdam.

The Student Village will be realized on a central location close to the Sloterdijk Station. What sets the project apart is its modular construction, based on a prefabricated housing unit for students. The construction method and low cost of construction means that the buildings can be taken apart and recycled after 10 years to make room for permanent housing. Because of the limited size of the apartments, care has been put in the design of the public spaces around the buildings. The height difference between the eastern and western edge of the area has led to a series of terraces that create a semiprivate zone around the buildings. Underneath the railway bridge north of the area is a protected area for outdoor sport, cinema, events and bicycle parking. On top of the coated steel panels of the units is a “second skin” of translucent screens of different colors. The screens give privacy to the inhabitants while letting light into the apartments, and lends an expression of lightness to the area.

Student Village
Amsterdam, NL

The area of Sloterdijk, just west of Amsterdam, is presently undergoing a radical transformation. After the financial crisis of 2008, many of the office buildings in Sloterdijk suffered from high rates of vacancy. Because of the lack of housing and other amenities in this relatively mono-functional office area, this lead to a decay of the environment as a whole. The municipality therefore made the decision to formulate a new zoning plan that allowed for 1,500 to 2,000 new dwellings and transformation of office buildings into short-stay apartments, answering to the need to build more housing in Amsterdam.

The Student Village will be realized on a central location close to the Sloterdijk Station. What sets the project apart is its modular construction, based on a prefabricated housing unit for students. The construction method and low cost of construction means that the buildings can be taken apart and recycled after 10 years to make room for permanent housing. Because of the limited size of the apartments, care has been put in the design of the public spaces around the buildings. The height difference between the eastern and western edge of the area has led to a series of terraces that create a semiprivate zone around the buildings. Underneath the railway bridge north of the area is a protected area for outdoor sport, cinema, events and bicycle parking. On top of the coated steel panels of the units is a “second skin” of translucent screens of different colors. The screens give privacy to the inhabitants while letting light into the apartments, and lends an expression of lightness to the area.

Student Village
Amsterdam, NL

The area of Sloterdijk, just west of Amsterdam, is presently undergoing a radical transformation. After the financial crisis of 2008, many of the office buildings in Sloterdijk suffered from high rates of vacancy. Because of the lack of housing and other amenities in this relatively mono-functional office area, this lead to a decay of the environment as a whole. The municipality therefore made the decision to formulate a new zoning plan that allowed for 1,500 to 2,000 new dwellings and transformation of office buildings into short-stay apartments, answering to the need to build more housing in Amsterdam.

The Student Village will be realized on a central location close to the Sloterdijk Station. What sets the project apart is its modular construction, based on a prefabricated housing unit for students. The construction method and low cost of construction means that the buildings can be taken apart and recycled after 10 years to make room for permanent housing. Because of the limited size of the apartments, care has been put in the design of the public spaces around the buildings. The height difference between the eastern and western edge of the area has led to a series of terraces that create a semiprivate zone around the buildings. Underneath the railway bridge north of the area is a protected area for outdoor sport, cinema, events and bicycle parking. On top of the coated steel panels of the units is a “second skin” of translucent screens of different colors. The screens give privacy to the inhabitants while letting light into the apartments, and lends an expression of lightness to the area.

Casa Tumán II
Puertecillo, Chile

After a year of doing several workshops about natural materials, we decided to make a big step and build our own experimental weekend house. We had the plot and the idea of a beach house of 50 m² organised in 6 modules: four bedrooms, one bathroom and one kitchen module. Each module has an independent access  from a big roofed terrace that is equal in size to the indoor space. The terrace was conceived as a shared common space; as a big open living room with a magnificent view of the sea.

Our idea was to participate actively in the process, building, researching, testing and coordinating the construction, calculating and ordering materials. Spending five months in the site gave us another perspective of designing while building and being able to model 1:1 and improvise.

The progress could be followed on the blog Casa Tumán.

 

Casa Tumán II
Puertecillo, Chile

After a year of doing several workshops about natural materials, we decided to make a big step and build our own experimental weekend house. We had the plot and the idea of a beach house of 50 m² organised in 6 modules: four bedrooms, one bathroom and one kitchen module. Each module has an independent access  from a big roofed terrace that is equal in size to the indoor space. The terrace was conceived as a shared common space; as a big open living room with a magnificent view of the sea.

Our idea was to participate actively in the process, building, researching, testing and coordinating the construction, calculating and ordering materials. Spending five months in the site gave us another perspective of designing while building and being able to model 1:1 and improvise.

The progress could be followed on the blog Casa Tumán.

 

Golden Box
Amsterdam, The Netherlands

In 2014, Studio Selva was asked to design a new façade for a chauffeur's break room next to Station Amsterdam Sloterdijk. The new façade has been executed completely in high-performance modified timber and simply hung onto the existing exterior wall which has been painted black. The rhythmical pattern of lamellae gives a monolithic character, while a custom-made semi-transparent shimmering coating makes the building contrast with the gray concrete structure of the railway above. Through its detached placement and minimalistic detailing the small building can be seen as a piece of furniture on the square.

 

Golden Box
Amsterdam, The Netherlands

In 2014, Studio Selva was asked to design a new façade for a chauffeur's break room next to Station Amsterdam Sloterdijk. The new façade has been executed completely in high-performance modified timber and simply hung onto the existing exterior wall which has been painted black. The rhythmical pattern of lamellae gives a monolithic character, while a custom-made semi-transparent shimmering coating makes the building contrast with the gray concrete structure of the railway above. Through its detached placement and minimalistic detailing the small building can be seen as a piece of furniture on the square.

 

Golden Box
Amsterdam, The Netherlands

In 2014, Studio Selva was asked to design a new façade for a chauffeur's break room next to Station Amsterdam Sloterdijk. The new façade has been executed completely in high-performance modified timber and simply hung onto the existing exterior wall which has been painted black. The rhythmical pattern of lamellae gives a monolithic character, while a custom-made semi-transparent shimmering coating makes the building contrast with the gray concrete structure of the railway above. Through its detached placement and minimalistic detailing the small building can be seen as a piece of furniture on the square.

 

Mirror House
Almere, The Netherlands

After De Realiteit and De Fantasie, the third edition of small experimental housing settlements in Almere has been launched under the title De Eenvoud. The brief of the competition called for an individual house with a strong relation to its surroundings. The twelve winning teams were given the possibility to realize their designs in an open area in the forest of Noorderplassen-West, but had to find the buyers of the houses themselves.

The Mirror House is a private villa with a facade consisting entirely of reflective glass, which acts as a camouflage and an obstruction of the view of its interior. The floorplan has been designed to be as compact as possible, with the possibility to adapt to different lifestyles. In dialogue with the client, the competition proposal was worked out to the smallest detail, taking a demand for optimum accessibility into consideration. The original concept with a slightly raised floor (for a better view), sliding doors, built-in cupboards and a single-level layout, has therefore been further refined. Long sightlines in the interior make the house appear larger from the inside, and anchor it to its surroundings. All interior walls are covered with a birch multiplex panel, whose warm appearance contrasts with the elegant and strict glass facade.

Photos: Jeroen Musch

Mirror House
Almere, The Netherlands

After De Realiteit and De Fantasie, the third edition of small experimental housing settlements in Almere has been launched under the title De Eenvoud. The brief of the competition called for an individual house with a strong relation to its surroundings. The twelve winning teams were given the possibility to realize their designs in an open area in the forest of Noorderplassen-West, but had to find the buyers of the houses themselves.

The Mirror House is a private villa with a facade consisting entirely of reflective glass, which acts as a camouflage and an obstruction of the view of its interior. The floorplan has been designed to be as compact as possible, with the possibility to adapt to different lifestyles. In dialogue with the client, the competition proposal was worked out to the smallest detail, taking a demand for optimum accessibility into consideration. The original concept with a slightly raised floor (for a better view), sliding doors, built-in cupboards and a single-level layout, has therefore been further refined. Long sightlines in the interior make the house appear larger from the inside, and anchor it to its surroundings. All interior walls are covered with a birch multiplex panel, whose warm appearance contrasts with the elegant and strict glass facade.

Photos: Jeroen Musch

Mirror House
Almere, The Netherlands

After De Realiteit and De Fantasie, the third edition of small experimental housing settlements in Almere has been launched under the title De Eenvoud. The brief of the competition called for an individual house with a strong relation to its surroundings. The twelve winning teams were given the possibility to realize their designs in an open area in the forest of Noorderplassen-West, but had to find the buyers of the houses themselves.

The Mirror House is a private villa with a facade consisting entirely of reflective glass, which acts as a camouflage and an obstruction of the view of its interior. The floorplan has been designed to be as compact as possible, with the possibility to adapt to different lifestyles. In dialogue with the client, the competition proposal was worked out to the smallest detail, taking a demand for optimum accessibility into consideration. The original concept with a slightly raised floor (for a better view), sliding doors, built-in cupboards and a single-level layout, has therefore been further refined. Long sightlines in the interior make the house appear larger from the inside, and anchor it to its surroundings. All interior walls are covered with a birch multiplex panel, whose warm appearance contrasts with the elegant and strict glass facade.

Photos: Jeroen Musch

Mirror House
Almere, The Netherlands

After De Realiteit and De Fantasie, the third edition of small experimental housing settlements in Almere has been launched under the title De Eenvoud. The brief of the competition called for an individual house with a strong relation to its surroundings. The twelve winning teams were given the possibility to realize their designs in an open area in the forest of Noorderplassen-West, but had to find the buyers of the houses themselves.

The Mirror House is a private villa with a facade consisting entirely of reflective glass, which acts as a camouflage and an obstruction of the view of its interior. The floorplan has been designed to be as compact as possible, with the possibility to adapt to different lifestyles. In dialogue with the client, the competition proposal was worked out to the smallest detail, taking a demand for optimum accessibility into consideration. The original concept with a slightly raised floor (for a better view), sliding doors, built-in cupboards and a single-level layout, has therefore been further refined. Long sightlines in the interior make the house appear larger from the inside, and anchor it to its surroundings. All interior walls are covered with a birch multiplex panel, whose warm appearance contrasts with the elegant and strict glass facade.

Photos: Jeroen Musch

 

Jardins de Métis
Grand-Métis, Canada

The installation is an ambiguous intervention open to multiple interpretations that aims to leave the visitor in a state of mental suspension. This contextual installation invites the visitor to reflect upon our relation to nature within the field of garden architecture. Is nature something to cherish? To protect? To tame? To exploit? What if instead of designing the content we solely concentrated on designing the container?

Photos: Jeroen Musch

 

Jardins de Métis
Grand-Métis, Canada

The installation is an ambiguous intervention open to multiple interpretations that aims to leave the visitor in a state of mental suspension. This contextual installation invites the visitor to reflect upon our relation to nature within the field of garden architecture. Is nature something to cherish? To protect? To tame? To exploit? What if instead of designing the content we solely concentrated on designing the container?

Photos: Jeroen Musch

Exhibition Orrefors Museum
Orrefors, Sweden

It was always a dream to design and build an exhibition in this stylish little museum hidden in the dense forests of southern Sweden. Our 20 metre long table displays four decades of portraits, artistic and commercial photography by John Selbing (photographer and designer at Orrefors glassworks 1932-73) as well as his unique minimalistic glass designs. The exhibition was initiated by Anders Selbing and curated with the help of Zhenia Sveshinsky. Open from the 28th of June until the 14th of August this summer.

Exhibition Orrefors Museum
Orrefors, Sweden

It was always a dream to design and build an exhibition in this stylish little museum hidden in the dense forests of southern Sweden. Our 20 metre long table displays four decades of portraits, artistic and commercial photography by John Selbing (photographer and designer at Orrefors glassworks 1932-73) as well as his unique minimalistic glass designs. The exhibition was initiated by Anders Selbing and curated with the help of Zhenia Sveshinsky. Open from the 28th of June until the 14th of August this summer.

Exhibition Orrefors Museum
Orrefors, Sweden

It was always a dream to design and build an exhibition in this stylish little museum hidden in the dense forests of southern Sweden. Our 20 metre long table displays four decades of portraits, artistic and commercial photography by John Selbing (photographer and designer at Orrefors glassworks 1932-73) as well as his unique minimalistic glass designs. The exhibition was initiated by Anders Selbing and curated with the help of Zhenia Sveshinsky. Open from the 28th of June until the 14th of August this summer.

Exhibition Orrefors Museum
Orrefors, Sweden

It was always a dream to design and build an exhibition in this stylish little museum hidden in the dense forests of southern Sweden. Our 20 metre long table displays four decades of portraits, artistic and commercial photography by John Selbing (photographer and designer at Orrefors glassworks 1932-73) as well as his unique minimalistic glass designs. The exhibition was initiated by Anders Selbing and curated with the help of Zhenia Sveshinsky. Open from the 28th of June until the 14th of August this summer.

Studio Selva (formerly Johan Selbing Architecture) is a young architecture office with experience in projects of very different scales and program, from housing areas to urban furniture, bridges and villa’s. The office consists of the two partners, Alondra Paz Vargas and Johan Selbing. Their designs often deal with sustainability, material experiments, contextual analysis and involvement from conceptual stage to project completion.

Designed by Haller Brun
Programmed by Studio Selva

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Studio Selva
Amaliastraat 5
1052 GM Amsterdam
The Netherlands

www.studioselva.nl
info@studioselva.nl
T +31 (0)6 21903504

Kamer van Koophandel 64959317
Architectenregister 1.050715.014